Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity

Let me start off by saying that I love all Mo Willems books. Every time I read one to a child, it’s an instant favorite. You can’t go wrong with any of them; all of his books are funny–written to appeal to both kids and adults–and feature his wonderful illustrations. I’ll be sharing more Mo Willems books in future posts and, frankly, any of them are great choices. In this review, however, we’re talking about Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity.

When Dad takes Trixie to school with her beloved, one-of-a-kind Knuffle Bunny to show all of her friends in Pre-K, she gets an unexpected surprise. Sonja also has a bunny…a Nuffle Bunny. Suddenly, Trixie’s one-of-a-kind bunny isn’t so one-of-a-kind anymore. Each believing that their bunny is the most special, the girls argue and one-up each other until the teacher, Ms. Greengrove, has no choice but to take the bunnies away. When school ends and the bunnies are returned, the story gets even better.

While this is a fun story for anyone to share, there is a sweetness in the relationship Trixie has with her Daddy that qualifies it as a great Read with Dad Month pick.  In the middle of the night when Trixie realizes she has a problem, she and her Dad go on a late night rescue adventure. Through her Knuffle Bunny experience, Trixie learns a valuable lesson about jealousy, sharing and, eventually, friendship. This is a really nice book for a Dad to share with his daughter–although any little boy with a favorite special toy can relate as well. Make sure you read the epilogue too, it’s the perfect ending.

The illustration features Mo Willem’s full-color, hand drawn characters on top of black and white photographs. The effect is so different and interesting; you can’t stop looking at all the detail. The story is realistic and clever, and in my experience reading it to kids, always keeps their attention. Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity is a 2008 Caldecott Honor winner and the sequel to Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, a 2005 Caldecott Honor winner.

Mo Willems started his career in television, writing for Sesame Street and earning six Emmys. He is the author of many favorite children’s books, including Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus (a 2004 Caldecott Honor winner) and its sequels, as well as the Elephant and Piggie early reader series.

Perfect for girls and boys ages 4 to 8.

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