Poetry for Summer

Our three year old has taken on a new schedule for the summer. It goes something like this:  the slightest glimpse of sunlight appears around his blackout window shade and he is immediately up. The time doesn’t matter. For the past few weeks his average waking time is around 4:30 a.m.  As you probably also experience with your own kids, when he is awake, the whole house is awake. He’s loud, his toys are loud and he wants his breakfast. Everyone is grumpy. Enough said.

This new ‘summer version’ of my son has prompted us to get him to bed earlier. The hard part is that since it’s still light outside here at 7:30 p.m., he doesn’t think it’s time for bed. And, the nightly bedtime challenge ensues.

The whole situation started me thinking about the wonderful Robert Louis Stevenson poem, Bed in Summer. If you don’t know it, here it is…

In winter I get up at night
And dress by yellow candlelight.
In summer, quite the other way,
I have to go to bed by day.

I have to go to bed and see
The birds still hopping on the tree,
Or hear the grown-up people’s feet
Still going past me in the street.

And does it not seem hard to you,
When all the sky is clear and blue,
And I should like so much to play,
To have to go to bed by day?

In addition to his highly regarded novels including Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Robert Louis Stevenson published many children’s poems. They are beautifully written with a childlike sense of wonder—a perfect way to introduce poetry to your child. Some of my favorites are The Swing, Summer Sun, Where Go the Boats?, The Moon and The Land of Nod.  Both parents and children will enjoy Stevenson’s poetry. Each time I read The Swing, it brings back memories of how it felt to fly through the air on the swings as a child, with each pass going higher and higher. Keep in mind that these poems were written in the 1800s and you will occasionally need to explain the meaning of some words or phrases– it’s a great opportunity to expose your child to different words and show them how language has changed over the years.

Stevenson’s poetry is published in the book A Child’s Garden of Verses. Many versions have been published since the original release in 1885, with different illustrators artwork featured. The version illustrated by Brian Wildsmith is a favorite. I find his art to be whimsical and interesting – it’s a beautiful compliment to the poetry.

You can also find his poems online for free by simply by doing an Internet search.  A fun activity is to download the poems, read them to your child and have them draw their own illustrations based on what it means to them.

Summer is a wonderful time to explore new things including books, interests and art forms with your child. I hope you’ll consider poetry as one of those new experiences this year.

Perfect for boys and girls, ages 4+

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